Research shows impact of Facebook unfriending Reply

High school friends often first to go

DENVER (April 22, 2014) – Two studies from the University of Colorado Denver are shedding new light on the most common type of `friend’ to be unfriended on Facebook and their emotional responses to it.

The studies, published earlier this year, show that the most likely person to be unfriended is a high school acquaintance. More…

Ginseng can treat and prevent influenza and RSV, researcher finds Reply

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
21-Apr-2014

ATLANTA–Ginseng can help treat and prevent influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a respiratory virus that infects the lungs and breathing passages, according to research findings by a scientist in Georgia State University’s new Institute for Biomedical Sciences.

In a recent issue of Nutrients and an upcoming publication of the International Journal of Molecular Medicine, Sang-Moo Kang reports the beneficial effects of ginseng, a well-known herbal medicine, on human health. More…

Cancer stem cells linked to drug resistance Reply

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

20-Apr-2014

Discovery of previously undefined molecular pathway is step toward novel clinical trial

Most drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers also promote drug-resistance and ultimately spur tumor growth. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a molecule, or biomarker, called CD61 on the surface of drug-resistant tumors that appears responsible for inducing tumor metastasis by enhancing the stem cell-like properties of cancer cells. More…

Why alcoholism saps muscle strength Reply

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
21-Apr-2014

Mitochondrial repair may be to blame for muscle weakness in mitochondrial diseases and in long-time alcoholics

 

(PHILADELPHIA) — Muscle weakness is a common symptom of both long-time alcoholics and patients with mitochondrial disease. Now researchers have found a common link: mitochondria that are unable to self-repair. The results will be published online April 21 in The Journal of Cell Biology. The link to self-repair provides researchers both a new way to diagnose mitochondrial disease, and a new drug target. More…

Early mortality risk reduced up to 40 percent through increased physical activity and sports Reply

Public release date: 20-Oct-2011

Even though previous studies have been shown the link between regular exercises and improved health the exact dose-response relation remains unclear. Guenther Samitz, researcher in physical activity and public health at the Centre for Sports Sciences and University Sports of the University of Vienna has investigated this relationship with a meta-study representing more than 1.3 million participants. The research project was carried out in collaboration with public health scientists and epidemiologists of the Universities of Bern, Switzerland and Bristol, UK. The results of the study have been published in International Journal of Epidemiology. More…

Human Norovirus In Groundwater Remains Infective After Two Months Reply

Public release date: 20-Oct-2011

Researchers from Emory University have discovered that norovirus in groundwater can remain infectious for at least 61 days. The research is published in the October Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

Human norovirus is the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis. The disease it causes tends to be one of the more unpleasant of those that leave healthy people unscathed in the long run, with diarrhea and vomiting that typically last for 48 hours. Norovirus sickens one in 15 Americans annually, causing 70,000 hospitalizations, and more than 500 deaths annually, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More…

Low vitamin B12 levels may lead to brain shrinkage, cognitive problems Reply

Public release date: 26-Sep-2011

 

(CHICAGO) – Older people with low blood levels of vitamin B12 markers may be more likely to have lower brain volumes and have problems with their thinking skills, according to researchers at Rush University Medical Center.

 

The results of the study are published in the Sept. 27 issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. More…

Increased caffeinated coffee consumption associated with decreased risk of depression in women 1

Public release date: 26-Sep-2011

The risk of depression appears to decrease for women with increasing consumption of caffeinated coffee, according to a report in the September 26 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Caffeine is the most frequently used central nervous system stimulant in the world, and approximately 80 percent of consumption is in the form of coffee, according to background information in the article. Previous research, including one prospective study among men, has suggested an association between coffee consumption and depression risk. Because depression is a chronic and recurrent condition that affects twice as many women as men, including approximately one of every five U.S. women during their lifetime, “identification of risk factors for depression among women and the development of new preventive strategies are, therefore, a public health priority,” write the authors. They sought to examine whether, in women, consumption of caffeine or certain caffeinated beverages is associated with the risk of depression. More…

Pregnant women who exercise protect their offspring against long-term neurodegenerative diseases Reply

Public release date: 26-Sep-2011

New research in the FASEB Journal suggests that prenatal exercise improves brain plasticity, decreases toxic protein deposits, inflammation and oxidative stress, which wards off Alzheimer’s and other diseases. More…

Marker for Alzheimer’s disease rises during day and falls with sleep Reply

Public release date: 26-Sep-2011

Up-and-down cycle flattens as age disrupts pattern

A marker for Alzheimer’s disease rises and falls in the spinal fluid in a daily pattern that echoes the sleep cycle, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found. More…

New analysis of the cardiovascular risks of common non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs 1

Public release date: 27-Sep-2011

 

An updated study published in this week’s PLoS Medicine gives some new information on the cardiovascular risks of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs () and suggests that among these commonly used drugs, naproxen and low dose ibuprofen are least likely to increase cardiovascular risk where as diclofenac, even in doses available without prescription, elevates risk.

More…

Low zinc and copper levels might cause spontaneous abortion Reply

Public release date: 27-Sep-2011

This hypothesis had never been proven before in humans, and it has been demonstrated by University of Granada researchers. Spontaneous abortion is estimated to affect 15 percent of women, mainly in the first trimester of pregnancy. More…

Popular colorectal cancer drug may cause permanent nerve damage Reply

Public release date: 28-Sep-2011

Nerve degeneration detected with skin biopsies

Oxaliplatin, a platinum-based anticancer drug that’s made enormous headway in recent years against colorectal cancer, appears to cause nerve damage that may be permanent and worsens even months after treatment ends. The chemotherapy side effect, described by Johns Hopkins researchers in the September issue of Neurology, was discovered in what is believed to be the first effort to track oxaliplatin-based nerve damage through relatively cheap and easy punch skin biopsies. More…

Big Tobacco knew radioactive particles in cigarettes posed cancer risk but kept quiet Reply

Public release date: 28-Sep-2011

Tobacco companies knew that cigarette smoke contained radioactive alpha particles for more than four decades and developed “deep and intimate” knowledge of these particles’ cancer-causing potential, but they deliberately kept their findings from the public, according to a new study by UCLA researchers.

The analysis of dozens of previously unexamined internal tobacco industry documents, made available in 1998 as the result of a legal settlement, reveals that the industry was aware of cigarette radioactivity some five years earlier than previously thought and that tobacco companies, concerned about the potential lung cancer risk, began in-depth investigations into the possible effects of radioactivity on smokers as early as the 1960s. More…

Commonly used supplement may improve recovery from spinal cord injuries / Acetyl-L-carnitine or ALC Reply

Public release date: 28-Sep-2011

LEXINGTON, Ky. — A commonly used supplement is likely to improve outcomes and recovery for individuals who sustain a spinal cord injury (SCI), according to research conducted by University of Kentucky neuroscientists.

Sasha Rabchevsky, associate professor of physiology, Patrick Sullivan, associate professor of anatomy and neurobiology, and Samir Patel, senior research scientist — all of the UK Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research Center (SCoBIRC) — have discovered that in experimental models, severe spinal cord injury can be treated effectively by administering the supplement acetyl-L-carnitine or ALC, a derivative of essential amino acids that can generate metabolic energy, soon after injury. More…